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Milwaukee Restaurants

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Treat your taste buds: Explore Milwaukee restaurants

Milwaukee Restaurants

A photo of Oggie’s Kitchen & Bar restaurant
4.1
Excellent(83)
$$$$
• American • Milwaukee
Booked 13 times today
Oggie’s Kitchen & Bar is an ode to the Ogden Family’s history in Milwaukee. Set in the Renovated Hotel Metro in Milwaukee’s downtown, Oggie's is a neighborhood hangout with one of the best burger's in Milwaukee alongside fantastic seasonal cocktails. Comfortable environment, all are welcome!

Discover Milwaukee

If you’ve never dined in Milwaukee, you might need a translator. For instance, what’s booyah? Small plates are on the rise, but you can still find schnitzel that’s roughly the size of your head. Sauerkraut, mashed potatoes and shaved ham are considered garnishes. Fried Wisconsin cheese curds pair well with beer, and there’s plenty of both. In the 1840s, there was one tavern for every 40 residents. Beer is also put to good use with onions and Worcestershire sauce in a beloved bratwurst gravy. Visit on Friday, and you’re bound to find a family-style fish fry. Roman Catholic immigrants of the 1800s shunned meat on Fridays, and lake perch was cheap. Restauranteurs Louis and Ruth Hirschinger introduced all-you-can-eat fish dinners in the 1940s. Booyah, by the way, is an exotic name for chicken stew.

If you’ve never dined in Milwaukee, you might need a translator. For instance, what’s booyah? Small plates are on the rise, but you can still find schnitzel that’s roughly the size of your head. Sauerkraut, mashed potatoes and shaved ham are considered garnishes. Fried Wisconsin cheese curds pair well with beer, and there’s plenty of both. In the 1840s, there was one tavern for every 40 residents. Beer is also put to good use with onions and Worcestershire sauce in a beloved bratwurst gravy. Visit on Friday, and you’re bound to find a family-style fish fry. Roman Catholic immigrants of the 1800s shunned meat on Fridays, and lake perch was cheap. Restauranteurs Louis and Ruth Hirschinger introduced all-you-can-eat fish dinners in the 1940s. Booyah, by the way, is an exotic name for chicken stew.

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